MICHELIN Stars Toronto 2022


The first-ever MICHELIN guide Toronto is launched with 13 new MICHELIN-starred restaurants, including 12 one-star MICHELIN restaurants and one two-star restaurant. Kaiseki, Italian with top cocktails, and a French jewelry box are among the newcomers.

Aburi Hana © Leslie Seto/Aburi Hana

Aburi Hana — One Star

Food: Japanese/Kaiseki
Minimalist in design, Aburi Hana keeps the drama to the plates, using handmade Arita pottery with a history dating back to the 1600s. Chef Ryusuke Nakagawa presents a modern take on Kyō-Kaiseki’s storied menu . The maguro flower, a rose made from pieces of akami and chutoro, is breathtaking, and the kurobuta kakuni, aka pork belly simmered over foie gras, is dazzling.

Alo © Jonathan Adediji/Alo

Alo © Jonathan Adediji/Alo

Alo — One Star

Kitchen: Contemporary
Here, the kitchen team seamlessly fuses European and Asian sensibilities in a unique tasting menu with dishes like creamy Koshihikari risotto enhanced with porcini mushroom emulsion or rack of lamb with Thai green curry. Showing flexibility and talent, Alo is one of the rare performers who never takes himself too seriously.

Alobar Yorkville © Jonathan Adediji/Alobar Yorkville

Alobar Yorkville © Jonathan Adediji/Alobar Yorkville

Alobar Yorkville — One Star

Type of cuisine: French
Set down an alley and built with seafoam green banquettes and sleek wooden tables cast in an amber glow, this effortlessly cool destination could easily be mistaken for a cocktail bar. It’s certainly as lively as one, but it’s also so much more. From glazed lobster with lime aioli to rack of lamb with Niçoise olive, the cuisine offers a refined approach that suits all occasions.

Don Alfonso 1890 © Paula Wilson/Don Alfonso 1890

Don Alfonso 1890 © Paula Wilson/Don Alfonso 1890

Don Alfonso 1890 – A star

Italian food
Nestled atop the Westin, this restaurant feels like the chic spot in town, attracting party diners and foreigners who come to revel in the harbor views. The dishes echo the contemporary refinement of the dining room. The kitchen doesn’t think too much about many dishes, like in perfectly cooked Nova Scotia lobster with freshly fried mushrooms and a spinach ring filled with mashed potatoes.

Enigma Yorkville © Francis Jian Zhang

Enigma Yorkville © Francis Jian Zhang

Enigma Yorkville — One Star

Kitchen: Contemporary
Chef Quinton Bennett’s resume, with stints in London, Copenhagen and Johannesburg, is as varied and scintillating as the tile mosaics that stretch across the ceiling of this Yorkville gazebo. Using molecular techniques, he puts his vision of the world on the plate, playing with various textures and surprising combinations such as crucifers with smoked foie gras and dehydrated parmesan or tuna with beet greens and fermented daikon.

Edulis © Tobey Nemeth/Edulis

Edulis © Tobey Nemeth/Edulis

Edulis— One Star

Kitchen: Contemporary
Nestled on Niagara Street is this charming red house with a small flowered patio. The interior is equally attractive, with polished wooden floors, a soft yellow palette, and shelves lined with bric-a-brac. The pride and passion of the wife and husband owners and their staff is undeniably evident in this location. Sit down to a multi-course menu inspired by the Mediterranean.

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© Frilu © Tony Lam/Frilu

© Frilu © Tony Lam/Frilu

Frilu – A star

Kitchen: Contemporary
A small space packed with talent, the sparsely decorated nook leaves everything on the plate, with high-quality produce from their own farm paired with an intriguing Japanese element that feels natural. Meat and vegetables make memorable impressions, from hen of the woods mushrooms cooked on binchotan and set in an ikura mousse to grilled beef tongue with onion and anchovy mash.

Kaiseki Yu-zen Hashimoto © Goh Iromoto/Kaiseki Yu-zen Hashimoto

Kaiseki Yu-zen Hashimoto © Goh Iromoto/Kaiseki Yu-zen Hashimoto

Kaiseki Yu-zen Hashimoto – One Star

Food: Japanese/Kaiseki
Chef Masaki Hashimoto’s traditional eight-course kaiseki menu showcases the seasons while celebrating Japanese ingredients. It’s all about focusing on flash with refined intricate styling and attention to detail that borders on reverence.

Osteria Giulia © Rick O'Brien/Osteria Giulia

Osteria Giulia © Rick O’Brien/Osteria Giulia

Osteria Giulia — One star

Italian food
It seems nearly impossible to have a bad time at chef Rob Rossi’s Italian stunner. Flickering candlelight bounces off the cream-colored walls and blond oak tables that run the length of this restaurant that feels, at all times, totally in control thanks to suave staff. And while many Italian menus may look the same, Rossi focuses on the seafood-rich traditions of Liguria.

Quetzal © Rick O'Brien/Quetzal

Quetzal © Rick O’Brien/Quetzal

Quetzal – One Star

Type of cuisine: Mexican
It’s all on deck in this upscale destination. Almost everything on this tight menu goes through the kitchen’s 26-foot-long wood-burning grill which roars and smokes actively. At the end of the line is a unique earthenware comal chef, who bakes tortillas from heirloom corn that is nixtmalized and ground in-house.

Shoushin © Jackie Lin/Shoushin

Shoushin © Jackie Lin/Shoushin

Shushin – One Star

Type of cuisine: Japanese/sushi
Shushin makes a dramatic first impression with its light stone facade, and the drama continues inside, where a stunning hinoki counter awaits eager guests. Chef Jackie Lin leads the young team with care. The seasonal omakase sushi is particularly delicious.

Yukashi © Agato Consulting Inc./Yukashi

Yukashi © Agato Consulting Inc./Yukashi

Yukashi – One Star

Food: Japanese/Kaiseki
Chef Daisuke Izutsu has cooked for royals, dignitaries and you, if you’re one of the lucky 15 who got a spot in the intimate Yukashi. Solidly rooted in seasonality, this kaiseki-style menu is very original and personal. Some of the dishes are complex, while others lean humbly. The otsukuri, with slices of yuzu-zested shima aji, pickled turnip toro and hay-smoked hamachi delicately arranged on a white marble base, is a work of art.

Sushi Masaki Saito © Sushi Masaki Saito

Sushi Masaki Saito © Sushi Masaki Saito

Sushi Masaki Saito — Two stars

Type of cuisine: Japanese/sushi
Even if you lived next door, omakase with chef Masaki Saito would still feel like a faraway adventure. The foyer’s marble staircase, 200-year-old hinoki counter, and traditional Japanese woodwork and woodwork set the scene as he slices, nicks, and sprinkles the sea’s greatest treasures. Only here you’ll find shirako boldly skewered and grilled on binchotan, and only here you’ll eat melting slices of chutoro buried under a blizzard of white truffles.

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Hero Image: Aburi Hana © Leslie Seto/Aburi Hana

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